Research

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Adventures in R: A Function for Basic Data Screening in R

Note: I’m using my dissertation as an excuse to learn R. I’m going to put out some of my code for others to peruse/use/improve/correct. Hopefully we can all learn a little bit from it. If you do use it or change it, please let me know in the comments what you did so I can learn too! Most statistics that you are going to run rely on a number of assumptions about your data. One … Read more

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Adventures in R: A Function for Test-Retest Reliability for Two Variables in R

Note: I’m using my dissertation as an excuse to learn R. I’m going to put out some of my code for others to peruse/use/improve/correct. Hopefully we can all learn a little bit from it. If you do use it or change it, please let me know in the comments what you did so I can learn too! I have a lot of variables to dig through for data collection, and of course, it is vastly … Read more

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Adventures in R: Experiences with my Dissertation

Well, it has now been 6 months that I have been using R “regularly”. I set out from the beginning to learn R, and since the last time I attempted it, I need to make sure that I had external reasons for needing to learn it. To do that I told myself that I wouldn’t touch any statistical software that I had used previously (SPSS, SAS, MiniTab). This put me in the position that I … Read more

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Book Recommendation: Discovering Statistics

I have a confession to make. I really like statistics. It’s funny, because when I took it as an undergraduate, I didn’t like it at all. Flipping coins and counting M&Ms didn’t seem like something I could ever actually use. I did keep the textbook though; for some reason I thought that if I kept the book in my bookshelf long enough, I would actually begin to like the subject. I guess I assumed Stockholm … Read more

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Cohen’s d and Hedges’ g Excel Calculator

I needed to put together a simple little Excel calculator for these two common effect sizes. While there are many different online calculators out there, I like the idea that I can go in and verify the calculations if necessary, and add things to it (I would eventually like to add in confidence intervals for both effect sizes, if I can figure it out). I have this sheet calculating both Cohen’s d and Hedges’ g … Read more

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First Publication!

I just recently got my first journal article published in the Journal of Trainology (trainology.org).  It is based off of data from my thesis.  Check it out here: Click Here

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ACSM Position Stand Title

Focus on the Basics – aka KISS

In my strength and conditioning class today, my students worked through the ACSM Position Stand “Progression Models in Resistance Training for Healthy Adults“. A major concept to take home from that paper, and something I try to emphasize in the class, is that the basics are important. The basics are what the biggest part of your progress is going to come from. The basics should be the vast majority of the training that you or your … Read more

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Great TED Talks: Melissa Marshall on Scientific Communication

Being able to relay what we do to the public and practitioners as scientists is incredibly important. My field, in particular, is especially applied. Most of what I study aims to improve the methods of practitioners. However, if I don’t take the time to relay this information to the people whose practice I am trying to improve- I’m not doing enough.  Here’s a TED talk from Melissa Marshall about how scientists can do a better … Read more

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New Research: Isometric versus Regular Barbell Squats

In the last issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, we had another paper published, this one based on the isometric squat. This was based off of some separate analysis we did with Caleb Bazyler‘s thesis. You’ve probably already seen some of the stuff I’ve done with the isometric mid thigh pull (IMTP with weightlifters, IMTP with powerlifters). The IMTP is a major research interest of mine (my dissertation is centered on this … Read more

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New Research: Loading the Hang High Pull Exercise

We have put together some neat studies using Tim Suchomel‘s thesis data.  One of Tim’s major research interests is the use of clean variations, and in particular, variations that don’t involve the catch (here’s a post all about ’em: clean variations without the catch). Here’s a quick video to watch so that we’re on the same page- For this paper, we examined the effect of manipulating loads on lower body kinetics. Participants did repetitions with 30%, 45%, … Read more

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New Research: PUSH Validity

Measuring and monitoring lift velocities is something that has been rapidly growing in popularity- for good reason. We can get all kinds of useful information from paying close attention to the bar velocities our athletes are able to create. We can use this information to direct training, to get a feel for athletes’ progress, and to assess preparedness. There are quite a few devices out there that do this. Tendo and GymAware are probably the … Read more

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New Research: Why you should do the isometric mid thigh pull in an upright position

I’ve been using the isometric mid-thigh pull extensively since I was first exposed to it as a master’s student. It is a useful test for evaluating strength and rate of force characteristics in athletes. Most of the variables obtained from the test are reliable, both within a session and between multiple sessions, and the majority relate well to a variety of dynamic (i.e. not isometric) skills, such as the countermovement jump and change of direction. … Read more

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No Victoria, the study didn’t “prove” anything

Don’t get me wrong, I love the “cult of science” that has become so popular. There are tons of people that are gaining a new appreciation of science as a field. The popularity of the revamp of Cosmos, or the gigantic layperson backlash against anti-vaxxers is a great thing. What I am leery of is the statement and the layperson perception that various things have been deemed “proven” by scientists (Note: I’m not sure that this perception is anything … Read more

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Protein Synthesis

Yes it is late to be putting up thoughts about the coaches college, here are some thoughts I had during a presentation on PWO nutrition by Dr. John Ivy: Being a strength-power oriented athlete and academic, I tend to think of increasing anabolism post-training as a means to cause adaptation to contractile proteins – focusing on the things that will increase strength, hypertrophy or RFD.  It would benefit me, and many others I’m sure, to … Read more

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Sport and Exercise Journals List

Will Hopkins has been doing a pretty neat thing every year after Thomson Reuters releases their citation reports. He takes the time to seek out all of the major sport and exercise journals in our field, and compiles a list of all of their impact factors. This is very useful for those of us who do research, as it gives us some idea of the places we may want to cite, and a small degree … Read more

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Sports Performance Measurements – Which data matter?

I love that we are collecting more data than ever before. There are new devices and technologies all of the time aiming to help us better understand training and performance. We have everything from the low end, like the Jawbone and Fitbit, all the way up to the high end, research-grade equipment. This means we have access to more sports performance measurements, more environments and more sports than ever before. There are also more people than … Read more

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We Are Not Training Weightlifters

Have you ever heard the following statement, or a variation thereof? “You should be building better <insert athlete type here>, not weightlifters” I have. Many strength and conditioning coaches have heard it, and will probably continue to hear that statement. Strength and conditioning coaches might even use that statement. On the surface I suppose, it seems logical. We are not trying to build better weightlifters. Due to reasons related to specificity (and if you read last week’s … Read more

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Why you should go to the 2014 ETSU Coaches and Sport Science College – December 5&6

While we are doing our best job to pump people up for this year’s College on the Sportscienceed website, I thought that I might try to do it a bit of justice here as well. The Coaches and Sport Science College is an event we hold every year here at ETSU in the winter. We bring in speakers from around the country (and sometimes, around the world), to talk on subjects related to sport. The vast majority of … Read more

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